Something clever I'll change later

I like fantasy. The end.
The Gate to Women's Country - Sheri S. Tepper 2.5 stars

The overall concept was familiar to me, but although I knew where it was going to end up, there were some twists along the way. I've dubbed it "lady sci-fi," and I put [b:The Handmaid's Tale|38447|The Handmaid's Tale|Margaret Atwood|http://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/books/1294702760s/38447.jpg|1119185] by Margaret Atwood as the shining example of this genre I made up, with something like [b:Native Tongue|285563|Native Tongue (Native Tongue, #1)|Suzette Haden Elgin|http://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/books/1348446358s/285563.jpg|2866090] by Suzette Haden Elgin and [b:A Gift Upon the Shore|149840|A Gift Upon the Shore|M.K. Wren|http://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/books/1344880577s/149840.jpg|144627] by M.K. Wren to be lesser known but no less viable alternatives.

It is interesting/different in that the women are the ones in charge after the men blew up the world. And of course the men are still maligned and they just want to take over and have sex. There are also Christian fundamentalists out in the woods treating women like cattle (this is no surprise, this is a common theme.)

It never quite got there for me. Maybe because I'm not a mother, and a lot of the themes of the book have to do with losing one's sons. The "climax" of the book, so to speak, as I'm not really sure there was a climax, seemed like it was supposed to be heart-breaking, but...I didn't care much.

Sometimes I get really tired of the lady sci-fi genre thumping the reader over the head with the ideas. Men are bad, Christianity is bad, you can only rely on women, etc.

Also there was a supernatural element and I HATE that.

And how could I forget. There was one really bizarre passage about how the women had isolated the "gay gene" and managed to eradicate it so we could all be breeders.

...

Yeah. No problem making people telepathic BUT NOT GAY ANYTHING BUT THAT.

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